Older Americans Carrying More Student Loan Debt

by Administrator
(Littleton)

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), although most student loan borrowers are young adults between the ages of 18 and 39, consumers age 60 and older are the fastest-growing segment of the student loan market.

Rise of student debt among older Americans

Between 2005 and 2015, the number of individuals age 60 and older with student loan debt quadrupled from about 700,000 to 2.8 million. The average amount of student loan debt owed by these older borrowers also increased from $12,100 to $23,500 over this period.

The reason for this trend is twofold: Borrowers are carrying their own student loan debt later in life (27% of cases), and they are taking out loans to finance their children's and grandchildren's college education (73% of cases), either directly or by co-signing a loan with the student as the primary borrower. Under the federal government's Direct Stafford Loan program, the maximum amount that undergraduate students can borrow over four years is $27,000 — an amount that is often inadequate to meet the full cost of college.

What's at stake

The increasing student loan debt burden of older Americans has serious implications for their financial security. In 2015, 37% of federal student loan borrowers age 65 and older were in default on their loans. Unfortunately for these individuals, federal student loans generally cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, and Uncle Sam can and will get its money — the government is authorized to withhold a portion of a borrower's tax refund or Social Security benefits to collect on the debt.


The CFPB also found that older Americans with student loans (federal or private) have saved less for retirement and often forgo necessary medical care at a higher rate than individuals without student loans. It all adds up to a tough situation for older Americans, whose income stream is typically ramping down, not up, unlike their younger counterparts.

Think before you borrow

Since the majority of older Americans are incurring student loan debt to finance a child's or grandchild's college education, how much is too much to borrow? It's different for every family, but one general guideline is that a student's overall debt shouldn't be more than his or her projected annual starting salary, which in turn often depends on the student's major and job prospects. But this is just a guideline. Many variables can impact a borrower's ability to pay back loans, and many families have been burned by borrowing amounts that may have seemed reasonable at first glance but now, in reality, are not.

Frank Mokosak
Frank Mokosak (Photo: Special to the Register)
If the numbers don't add up, students can reduce the cost of college by choosing a less expensive school, living at home or becoming a resident assistant (RA) to save on room costs, or graduating in three years instead of four.

Frank Mokosak, CFP® is a Principal and Investor Coach at Mokosak Advisory Group.

Source: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/money/business/columnists/2017/07/12/older-americans-carrying-more-student-loan-debt/472254001/

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